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Hot Fudge Ice Cream

Hot Fudge Sundae

Almost as iconic as an ice cream sundae—a hearty helping of Coop’s to go with it.


Picture this: gooey dark chocolate swirled in between layers of melty-sweet ice cream, fluffy dollops of whipped cream and a few perfectly red cherries. Are you drooling yet?


Almost as iconic as a hot fudge sundae—a hearty helping of Coop’s to go with it. Picture this: gooey dark chocolate swirled in between layers of melty-sweet ice cream, fluffy dollops of whipped cream and a few perfectly red cherries.

Creating a hot fudge sundae with Coop's is a delightful and simple process:


Ingredients:

Vanilla ice cream (classic choice as a neutral and versatile base, feel free to use other flavors)

Coop's Hot Fudge (choose Coop's vegan fudge for a dairy free, vegan option)

Whipped cream

Chopped nuts (e.g., peanuts, walnuts)

Maraschino cherries

Sprinkles (optional)


Instructions:

Prepare the Ice Cream:

Start by scooping a generous serving of vanilla ice cream into a bowl or a glass.


Warm Coop's Hot Fudge:

Gently warm the Coop's Hot Fudge in the microwave or on the stovetop, following the instructions on the jar. Warming the fudge enhances its pourability.


Drizzle with Coop's Hot Fudge:

Pour a generous amount of the warm Coop's Hot Fudge over the vanilla ice cream. The rich, velvety sauce will begin to melt into the ice cream, creating a delicious contrast of temperatures and textures.


Add Whipped Cream:

Top your hot fudge and ice cream with a dollop of whipped cream. You can use store-bought whipped cream or make your own by whipping heavy cream with a little sugar until it's stiff.


Sprinkle with Nuts:

Sprinkle chopped nuts (e.g., peanuts, walnuts) over the whipped cream. This adds a satisfying crunch to your sundae.


Garnish with Cherries:

Place a maraschino cherry on top of the whipped cream.


Optional Sprinkles:

If you'd like, add a sprinkle of colorful sprinkles for a playful touch.


Serve and Enjoy:

Your Coop's Hot Fudge Hot Fudge Sundae is ready to be savored. Serve it immediately while the fudge is warm and the ice cream is cold.



Almost as iconic as a hot fudge sundae—a hearty helping of Coop’s to go with it. Picture this: gooey dark chocolate swirled in between layers of melty-sweet ice cream, fluffy dollops of whipped cream and a few perfectly red cherries.

Origins of the Hot Fudge Sundae

The hot fudge sundae has a rich and flavorful history that traces back to the late 19th century. Its precise origin is the subject of some debate, but one of the most widely accepted stories places its birth in C.C. Browns in Los Angeles, California, in the early 1900s.


Charles C. Brown, the proprietor of C.C. Browns, is said to have concocted this delightful treat by topping a scoop of vanilla ice cream with his signature thick, warm fudge sauce, creating a sensation among his patrons. The rich, gooey hot fudge paired perfectly with the cold ice cream, and the combination quickly gained popularity.

Almost as iconic as a hot fudge sundae—a hearty helping of Coop’s to go with it. Picture this: gooey dark chocolate swirled in between layers of melty-sweet ice cream, fluffy dollops of whipped cream and a few perfectly red cherries.

Soon after, hot fudge sundaes became a staple in ice cream parlors and soda fountains across the United States. Variations of the hot fudge sundae emerged, featuring an array of toppings like whipped cream, nuts, maraschino cherries, and sprinkles.


While C.C. Browns in Los Angeles is one of the commonly cited origins, there are a few other contenders. Some of the other claimants include:


Almost as iconic as an ice cream sundae—a hearty helping of Coop’s to go with it. Picture this: gooey dark chocolate swirled in between layers of melty-sweet ice cream, fluffy dollops of whipped cream and a few perfectly red cherries.
  • Two Rivers, Wisconsin: One popular claim comes from Two Rivers, Wisconsin, where a druggist named Edward Berners is said to have served the first ice cream sundae in the late 19th century. This version of the sundae was made with chocolate syrup.

  • Ithaca, New York: Another story suggests that a soda fountain proprietor in Ithaca, New York, named Chester Platt, created the "Cherry Sunday" in the late 19th century. The spelling of "sunday" was later changed to "sundae" to remove any religious connotations.

  • Evanston, Illinois: The city of Evanston, Illinois, has also claimed to be the birthplace of the sundae. Some sources credit the city's strict Blue Laws, which prohibited the sale of ice cream sodas on Sundays, as the inspiration for the creation of the ice cream sundae.






The true origin of the ice cream sundae remains ambiguous due to the lack of comprehensive historical records. These stories are often passed down through local legends, and different places have their own variations of the tale. The exact birthplace of the sundae may never be definitively determined, but what's clear is that this delightful dessert has become a beloved part of American culinary history.











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